Jeremy Kyle Declared An ‘Interested Party’ In TV Show Guest’s Death Inquest



ITV/Steve Dymond/Facebook

The death of a guest who featured on The Jeremy Kyle Show saw the show cancelled, and now Jeremy Kyle himself is being investigated for playing part in the man’s death.


Steve Dymond sadly took his own life after featuring on the show last year. He had taken a lie detector test to prove to his fiancée Jane Callaghan that he hadn’t been unfaithful, but failed the test causing the two to split.


After failing the test, host Jeremy Kyle was described to have gotten up in Dymond’s face, jeered at him and called the 63-year-old a failure causing Steve to break down into tears.



jeremy kyleITV

One the way home from filming, Dymond reportedly called his brother and said how the ordeal had made him want to take his own life, according to The Mirror.


Just a week later after the show was filmed, Dymond took a fatal overdose.


Dymond’s death not only led to the cancellation of The Jeremy Kyle Show after 14 years on air, but sparked an inquest into his death as well. As part of the investigation, Kyle has been declared as an ‘interested party’.


Evidence has suggested that the 55-year-old TV host ‘may have caused or contributed to the death’.



jeremy kyleITV

The inquest had previously heard that prior to going on the programme and doctor had declared that Dymond had a ‘concrete plan’ to take his own life and that there was a ‘real and immediate risk’ to the 63-year-old’s life.


Caoilfhionn Gallagher QC who is representing Dymond’s family in the ongoing case has claimed the show failed to safeguard Dymond whom he dubbed as ‘vulnerable’.


As per The Mirror, the lawyer said:



Mr Dymond was extremely distressed by his experience at The Jeremy Kyle Show, a programme which has been described by a judge when sentencing a former contestant as ‘human bear-baiting’.


Following his death the show was axed and widespread concerns were raised regarding the format of the show, its selection and treatment of participants, and aftercare.



Gallagher added, ‘It is clear from the records that at this time Mr Dymond had suicidal ideation, his suicidal thoughts were recurrent and they were accompanied by a concrete plan as to how to do it.’


If you’re experiencing distressing thoughts and feelings, the Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) is there to support you. They’re open from 5pm–midnight, 365 days a year. Their national number is 0800 58 58 58 and they also have a webchat service if you’re not comfortable talking on the phone.