Man Who Got In Trouble For Coming To Work On Time Sparks Debate



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A man who showed up to work at exactly the moment his shift started got in trouble from his supervisor, which has sparked a heated debate online.


Writing anonymously on Reddit’s ‘Am I The Asshole’ subreddit, a man who recently began a new job as a security guard described a recent situation at his work. He apparently landed himself in hot water after showing up to work exactly on time. In his post, he simply asked whether he was wrong for getting into work ‘just on time’, which led to everyone sharing their opinions.


Explaining his situation, the security guard described how he arrived at the store that he was meant to be starting his new job at, at 10am on the dot. As this was the time his contract said he was meant to begin working, he thought nothing of it, but what happened next has sparked an interesting controversy.



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Taking a few minutes to put some personal belongings in the back room before starting his shift, the man was told by the store manager he needed to come into work a few minutes earlier in order to be ready to start work at 10am.


The man responded to his manager, saying that wouldn’t be happening as he didn’t see why he was required to be at work before his shift started when he wasn’t being paid for that time.


The general public was split over whether the man was right or wrong, though the most popular comments below the post leaned towards the security guard being in the wrong on the grounds that starting work at 10am means being clocked in and ready to begin your shift at that time, not just getting onto the premises.



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Some commenters sympathised with the security guard, believing they owed their employer nothing and shouldn’t be expected to give them more time than they were being paid for.


Yet others suggested a possible solution would be for staff to get paid for 15 minutes before their shift officially starts to ensure they’re at their post and ready to work when their shift begins. That way employees aren’t going unpaid for any pre-shift duties they may have before the job officially starts.


In this case, is the burden on the security guard to arrive a few minutes early and be ready for work at 10am, or on his employers to actually pay him for the time he spends whether his shift has started or not? Perhaps the answer is simple, but judging by the comments on this story, everyone has their own opinion.


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