Pro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. Wade


A protester splattered with red paint holds her hand up in anger at the front of a protest.
A massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.

Hours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. 


In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "my corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.


"The justices have blood on their hands," one of the protesters explained. 


"I just keep saying it's an incredibly sad day," said Marianna Ban, 20, a member of the group NYC Radical Women. "We knew it was coming and now it's here. But it's hopeful how many people showed up today that is a little glimmer of hope." 


New York 


A large crowd of protesters.
The somber and angry crowd in New York quickly grew to more than 1,000 people.
A protester places her hand on the woman standing next to her.
A pro-choice protester is comforted at a rally in lower Manhattan.
"Betrayed" in pink letters appears on a poster held up at a protest.
Pro-choice protesters held signs with words like "Betrayed."
A hand holds a sign: "We must not go back to the 1950s"
Many of the signs were hand-written.
A woman wears a blindfold and displays her hand, painted red.
An attendee at the protest in Washington Square Park in New York.
A woman holds up a sign at a protest.
The protest at Washington Square Park in New York.

Los Angeles, California 


A woman holds a handwritten sign: "My Body My Choice."
A protester holds a sign in downtown Los Angeles, California on June 24, 2002.
A masked person holds a sign: "This is a War on Women."
A protest held at the federal courthouse in Los Angeles, California.

Little Rock, Arkansas


The mood was of course much different in states where opposition to abortion access is widespread.


In Little Rock, Arkansas, fewer than a dozen anti-abortion protesters, along with about five kids, gathered on Friday afternoon outside Little Rock Family Planning Services, one of two clinics in the state that provides abortion services. 


"Christ knows I'm here and that's all that matters," one of them said when a photographer asked if she could be photographed. 


Three pro-choice advocates were also at the clinic, standing near clinic staff who help assist patients who seek services at the clinic. 


Arkansas is one of 13 states — the others are Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Texas, Oklahoma, and Wyoming — that have passed abortion ban "trigger laws." According to these laws, once the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade, removing any right to an abortion, a ban would automatically take effect. 


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Patricia Strack holds a sign outside Little Rock Family Planning Services in Arkansas on June 24, 2022.
A Bible is seen on a table on a sidewalk.
A Bible sits on a cooler outside of Little Rock Family Planning Services in Arkansas.
A cross is seen tucked into the trunk of a tree.
A cross is placed on a tree outside of Little Rock Family Planning Services.
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A woman holds a sign outside of Little Rock Family Planning Services in Arkansas.
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Several proponents of abortion access also held signs outside Little Rock Family Planning Services in Arkansas.
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Staff at Little Rock Family Planning Services in Arkansas are on hand to assist patients who come to the clinic.

 


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